• @Endward23
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    73 months ago

    To make some criticism: The first point seems to be true. But the reasoning doesn’t work. TV or radio doesn’t have the potential to do this. The second is merely a open question. The fourth point has not yet occurred. You compare a predicition with another! The fifth point is vaguely reminiscent of political correctness, but the web is precisely the place where the opposite also takes place.

    • kbal
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      13 months ago

      TV or radio doesn’t have the potential to do this.

      Really? Have you ever been on TV?

        • kbal
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          13 months ago

          I’m not sure what your point was, but presumably it wasn’t that you’ve spent so much time being on TV that you know what it’s like better than Marshall McLuhan did. His thoughts might be difficult to understand today because for one thing we assume so much about how television works as a broadcast medium that was still questionable even as late as the 1970s. Back then there were more possibilities as to how it might evolve. Instead it was replaced, in its role as an exciting new communications medium. But the experience of being in so-called cyberspace, even this part of it, does still have a little something in common with what it was like being on television fifty years ago.

          • @Endward23
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            13 months ago

            I mean, the internet can be used by nearly anyone. The classical tv, on the other hand, is limited to a very tiny group of prominent persons and a great audience of passiv listener.

            In my opinion, this makes a hugh difference.